Teen Wolf: “The Fox and the Wolf” is a history lesson that we didn’t need to hear.

 

Noshiko realizes that the Nogitsune has possessed Rhys. Copyright MTV

Noshiko realizes that the Nogitsune has possessed Rhys. Copyright MTV

The past few episodes have been all about saving Stiles while killing the Nogitsune, but where did the Nogitsune come from? In “The Fox and the Wolf,” we get a history lesson from the Yukimuras on the origins of the Nogitsune. Noshiko, Kira’s mother is a 900 year old Kitsune, who first came in contact with the Nogitsune at the Oak Creek internment camp in the 1940’s. Noshiko falls in love with a military man at the base.

At the station, Sheriff Stilinski releases Derek and Chris Argent with the promise that they help him track down Stiles. They meet up again with Allison at the Argent’s and decided to split up, Derek with Chris and  Allison with the Sheriff. But Derek is wary of Mr. Argent’s true intentions: what will really happen when he gets his hands on Stiles?

Mrs. Yukimura continues her story of her romance with Rhys and the secret they uncovered at the camp. Rhys and Noshiko found out that military members were selling the medicine on the black market.  A riot erupts between the Japanese camp members and the military men accused. But one of the Japanese women was a bitten werewolf.

While Allison and the Sheriff are in the hospital elevator, we finally get to see the toll that all of the things these teens face are taking on one of them. Stilinski marvels at Allison’s ability to be strong and fearless. But Allison, in a powerful performance by Crystal Reed, admits that she’s scared, she’s always terrified and tries to put on a brave face. She doesn’t know if Isaac is dying, where she stands with Scott, if Derek should be trusted, or what’s really on her father’s mind. And although all of these thoughts have to do with werewolves, Kitsunes and evil spirits, they are all feelings that many teenagers and people, in general, face. The scene stands out as powerful and relatable whereas the rest of the episode so far is more mythical.

Sheriff Stilinski comforts Allison. Copyright MTV

Sheriff Stilinski comforts Allison. Copyright MTV

During the riot at the camp Rhys is killed and badly burned, leading him to be wrapped in bandages.  Noshiko was still healing, lying next to the body of Rhys. She couldn’t heal fast enough and knew she would be killed so she called upon the spirits to bring forth the Nogitsune to possess her to exact revenge. But the Nogitsune instead possess the bandaged body of her dead lover, who begins terrorizing all those that remained alive after the riot. Noshiko stabbed and defeated the Nogitsune, shattering the Kitsune.  When Mrs. Yukimura tells Kira she’s the only one who can put the sword back together, it is revealed that Kira is a thunder Kitsune.

Back at the Stilinski home, a clue is left on the chessboard in Stiles room, which has names of the Beacon Hills residents labeled on each chess piece.  Argent believes it is a threat from the Nogitsune, who is signaling that he is now at Derek’s loft and is trying to lure them there.

At the end of Noshiko’s long account of history, she tells Kira and Scott what the characters and the audience already knew she believed: the only way to get rid of the Nogitsune was to kill Stiles. The only actual useful knowledge we gain from Noshiko’s tale is that she is the one who originally summoned the Nogitsune and that Scott, Stiles, and Allison’s sacrifice brought it back.

“The Fox and the Wolf” lacked in plot, but did a good job showcasing the state of mind of the characters.  We see Allison’s true fears come to light, the Sheriff’s ability to still care about others while trying to save his son, Chris Argent’s struggle with what is right, and Kira & Scott’s mutual determination not to repeat the mistakes of the past. The episode was able to highlight each characters feelings and opinions while also giving us a glimpse at their viewpoints and motives.

But still, the episode was almost useless, save for a few good lines, some useful tidbits of info and the one emotionally compelling scene. The flashbacks took up a completely unnecessary part of the episode and most of the story was not needed in order to further this plot along. The story could’ve been told in a much simpler way, leaving room for more interesting and more important things to play out.

1 Comment

  • Reply May 10, 2015

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